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ECMAScript 5 Array methods

ES5 has nice array methods. In case you didn't hear about them, I will show their usage with some examples.

.forEach()

.forEach invokes a function for each element in an array. For example,

// Sum all the numbers in an array
var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];
var sum = 0;

numbers.forEach(function(n){
    sum += n; 
});

console.log(sum); // 28 is the total sum
 

The invoked function can take 3 arguments:

  • Value of the element
  • Index of the element
  • The Array itself

Another example that doubles the numbers in an array

// Double all the numbers in an array
var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

numbers.forEach(function(n, i, ar){ 
    ar[i] = 2*n; 
});

// numbers =  [2, 4, 10, 14, 6, 20]

.map()

The function returns a value for each element in an array

// Square all the numbers in an array
var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

var squares = numbers.map(function(n){

    return n * n;
});

// numbers = [1, 4, 25, 49, 9, 100]

.filter()

.filter() returns only the elements that match a predicate. The predicate function returns either true or false

var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

// Filter even integers
var evens = numbers.filter(function(n){    
     return n % 2 === 0; // is n even ?
});

    console.log(evens); // evens = [2, 10]
var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

function isPrime(n)
{
    if (n <= 1) return false;
            
    for(var i = 2; i < n; i++) {
        if (n % i === 0) return false;
     }
    
    return true;
}

// Filter prime integers
var primes = numbers.filter(function(n){    
     return isPrime(n); // is n prime ?
});
    
console.log(primes); // primes = [2, 5, 7, 3]

Another example with objects

var people = [{
    name: "Helen",
    age: 24},
    {
    name: "Adam",
    age: 27},
    {
    name: "Sam",
    age: 19},
    {
    name: "Jordan",
    age: 30
    }];

var under25 = people.filter(function(p){
    return p.age < 25; // is person under 25 ?
});

console.log(under25); // under25 = [{name:"Helen", age:24}, {name:"Sam", age:19}]

// Find names of people that end in "m".
var names = people
    .map(function(p){return p.name;})
    .filter(RegExp.prototype.test, /m$/i);

console.log(names); // names = ["Adam", "Sam"]

.every()

Returns true if all the elements in an array match a predicate. Otherwise, it returns false

var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

var allEvens = numbers.every(function(n) {
    return n % 2 === 0; // is n even ?
});

var allSmall = numbers.every(function(n) {
    return n < 100; // is n less than 100?
});

console.log(allEvens); // false
console.log(allSmall); // true

.some()

.some() returns true if at least one element matches the predicate, and it returns false if none of the elements matches the predicate

// Does the array contain the integer 5 ? 
[1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10].some(function(n) {
    return n === 5;
})

// true

.reduce() and .reduceRight()

They both combine elements to return one single value. .reduce() processes elements from left to right, whereas .reduceRight() processes the elements from right to left.

var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10];

var sum = numbers.reduce(function(a, b){

    return a + b;    
});

console.log(sum); // sum = 28

var max = numbers.reduce(function(a, b){
    
    return a > b ? a : b;    // or simply Math.max(a, b)   
});

console.log(max); // max = 10

// NOTE: You can also use .apply() to obtain the maximum or minimum from Math class
    var maximum = Math.max.apply(null, numbers); // 10
    var minimum = Math.min.apply(null, numbers); // 1

.reduce() accepts a function, and this function takes two values and will reduce these values to return only one single value. In the examples above, it reduced a and b by adding them together, and by choosing the largest of the two. It starts by invoking the predicate for the first two values: 1 and 2. It takes the result 3 and invokes the function again with 3 and 5, and so on. In fact, The first argument, a, is the accumulated result of the previous invocation, and the second argument b is the next value to accumulate

.reduceRight() works in the same way as .reduce() except that it starts processing from the right of the array.

var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 10];

var result1 = numbers.reduceRight(function(a, b){  
 
    return  a / b;    
});

console.log(result1); // result1 = 10 / 5 / 2 / 1 = 1


var result2 = numbers.reduce(function(a, b){  
    
    return  a / b;    
});

console.log(result2); // result2 = 1 / 2 / 5 / 10 = 0.01

Example using objects

var people = [{
    name: "Helen",
    age: 24},
    {
    name: "Adam",
    age: 27},
    {
    name: "Sam",
    age: 19},
    {
    name: "Jordan",
    age: 30
    }];

// Find the youngest person
var youngest = people.reduce(function(p1, p2){
    return p1.age < p2.age ? p1 : p2; // NOTE: you cannot use Math.min(p1.age, p2.age) here
});


console.log("The youngest person is " + youngest.name + " and he/she is " + youngest.age + " years old"); 
// The youngest person is Sam and he/she is 19 years old

.indexOf() and .lastIndexOf()

They search an array for a specified value and return the index of the first element or -1 if no such value is found. .lastIndexOf() starts searching from right to left.

var numbers = [1, 2, 5, 7, 3, 10, 5];

numbers.indexOf(5); // 2
numbers.indexOf(5, 3); // start searching at index 3. Result is  6
numbers.indexOf(8); // -1

Note that both of these functions do not take a function as an argument. However, they take a value to search for. They also accept a second optional argument that specifies the starting index where the search begins.

Tags:

JavaScript

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